Welcome to the world of Kimona Creates

Welcome to the world of Kimona. I love to create beautiful things especially cards and customised stationery made from fabrics of all kinds. The process of making our products begins with the selection of the fabrics and materials and then is completely manual. We do not add bits to pre-existing printed card, we make our products from scratch.

We have an in-stock selection of cards which can be used for any occasion or can be adapted for special use Take a look at the posts to see some pictures of them.

We use several types of fabrics including a range of Thai silk, Chinese silk brocade, ribbon and sequins and a glittery Christmas range. We are always looking for new and exciting fabrics and ideas and can design anything to suit our clients needs and they have asked us to design special occasion stationery for weddings, barmitzvah's, christenings, parties and for corporate use. Our service is truely bespoke.

I would love you to join me on my creative journey and will keep you posted on what I get up to.

Be well and take good care,

Kim x

Wednesday, 9 March 2011

The Easter Bunny is almost here!

The Easter Bunny or Easter Hare is a character depicted as a rabbit bringing Easter eggs. In legend, the creature brings baskets filled with colored eggs, candy and sometimes also toys to the homes of children on the night before Easter. The Easter Bunny will either put the baskets in a designated place or hide them somewhere in the house or garden for the children to find when they wake up in the morning.

The Easter Bunny is a counterpart to the Santa Claus of Christmas, as they both bring gifts to children on the night before their respective holiday. It was first mentioned in Georg Franck von Frankenau's De ovis paschalibus (About the Easter Egg) referring to an Alsace tradition of an Easter Hare bringing Easter Eggs.

Bringing Easter eggs seems to have its origins in Alsace and the Upper Rhineland, both then in the Holy Roman Empire, and southwestern Germany, where the practice was first recorded in a German publication in the early 17th century. The first edible Easter Eggs were made in Germany during the early 19th century and were made of pastry and sugar.

The Easter Bunny was introduced to the United States by the German settlers who arrived in the Pennsylvania Dutch country during the 18th century.

The Catholic Encyclopedia says: "The rabbit is a pagan symbol and has always been an emblem of fertility" Eggs, like rabbits and hares, are fertility symbols of antiquity. Since birds lay eggs and rabbits and hares give birth to large litters in the early spring, these became symbols of the rising fertility of the earth at the Vernal Equinox.

The saying "mad as a March hare" refers to the wild caperings of hares as the males fight over the females in the early spring, then attempt to mate with them. Since the females often rebuff the males' advances before finally submitting, the mating behavior often looks like a crazy dance; these fights led early observers to believe that the advent of spring made the hares "mad". This bold behavior makes the hares, normally timid and retiring animals, much more conspicuous to human observation in the spring.

The precise origin of the ancient custom of coloring eggs is not known, although evidently the blooming of many flowers in spring coincides with the use of the fertility symbol of eggs—and eggs boiled with some flowers change their color, bringing the spring into the homes.

German Protestants wanted to retain the Catholic custom of eating colored eggs for Easter, but did not want to introduce their children to the Catholic rite of fasting. Eggs were forbidden to Catholics during the fast of Lent, which was the reason for the abundance of eggs at Easter time.

So this year Good Friday falls on April 22nd and Easter Monday on April 25th. Watch this space for more stuff about Easter.